December 2018

Wow! December was a packed month at Idioma Internacional.

As we began to wind down another great year, we had a lot to celebrate and a lot to be thankful for.

We actually kicked off December by having our annual Idioma Christmas party! We started the night off with a gift exchange at our office. As usual, a lot of the gifts were consumable (food and drink alike) and there were a few favorites that got stolen until they couldn’t be stolen again.

We took some pictures at the office and then loaded up in a private shuttle to head up to the mountains of Heredia and have the famous paella at La Lluna de Valencia. The night was replete with flamenco guitar and dancing, a fire show and the proprietor coming around with his famous bota full of wine! We ate, drank and had a really fun and warm Christmas celebration as a team.

December festivities continued with our 2nd annual Gingerbread House night! We got into teams and put on some villancicos to put us in the Christmas spirit while we got to work building our Gingerbread Houses.

All of this only brought us to the middle of December! We still had some events to go, not the least of which is our 2nd annual Christmas Pie in the Face Raffle.

At the end of every year, we choose a charity to support and raise money for by selling raffle tickets to our students. Our students can buy a raffle ticket and with it buy a chance for their teacher to get a pie to the face!

This year, we have been working closely with an organization called Boy with a Ball for which we raised 134,215.00 colones as a team! And with such a remarkable turnout, Idioma Internacional was able to match that amount and double the funds we were able to donate!

We picked the raffle ticket at random to find our lucky winner to get a pie in the face and sure enough, our teacher, Brian, who sold the most actually won!

And of course, each year an Administrator is also chose at random to participate because the only thing better than one person getting a pie in the face is two people getting a pie in the face!

With all the December and end-of-the-year activities behind us, we all hopped on planes, busses and in some cases, motorcycles, and headed out to enjoy some paid vacation time over the holidays. Here is a quick snapshot of the last sunset of 2018 in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica…

-Brendan Mulhall

 

 

Friendsgiving Costa Rica Style – November 2018

Venezuela, Costa Rica, Australia, Finland, United States—these are just a few of the nationalities represented at our Idioma Friendsgiving celebration this year. Needless to say, it was an international and very Tico-style Friendsgiving this year. There was not even a turkey in sight!

One of our teachers graciously invited the entire team to his home to celebrate with food, friends and to take an evening out of our busy lives to give thanks for all the blessings we enjoy living and working in beautiful Costa Rica.

We celebrated potluck style: a southern-inspired chicken and rice dish, green beans and bacon, goat cheese and almond dressed salad with a homemade balsamic, homemade cheese and fruit dip, mashed potatoes, a vegan curry, bread and dips, and brownies and a cranberry apple cinnamon cake to top it all off. And we had wine and sangria to drink, and of course a Costa Rican specialty: a homemade chiliguaro shot brought by a coworker to share.

We scrounged up benches, a couch, some beach chairs and anything we could find so that we all had a seat at the table to eat, chat, celebrate and be thankful together. While the food and drink were plentiful and flowed throughout the evening, it was spending time with both co-workers and friends that truly made this a Friendsgiving to remember.

-Brendan Mulhall

 

Costa Rican Independence Day Celebration

Every year, on September 15th, Costa Rica celebrates its independence and this year marked 197 years of a free and independent Costa Rica.

At Idioma Internacional, we have a celebration each year to mark this historic event and celebrate the ‘Pura Vida’ lifestyle we enjoy living and working in beautiful Costa Rica.

Each year, we eat the traditional tamal, wear a chonete and pañuelo and listen to the folklore and the history of the different important events that shaped Costa Rica’s becoming an independent and autonomous nation.

This year was even more special for two reasons. First, we currently have 3 classes at our office on Fridays: two classes of 11 Costa Rican youth with a socio-educational project we work on with Fundación Monge and a private class with 2 professional adults. So this year we were able to invite our Tico students to our celebration for a truly multicultural event.

Second, we had a surprise competition where our Idioma teachers were teamed up with our Tico students and charged with making a farol, or lantern, that symbolizes part of the lore of Costa Rican independence. Faroles are central to the Costa Rican independence day experience as Tico kids create them in school every year growing up.

We divided into mixed teams of foreign teachers and Tico students and got right to work! We had only 30 minutes to construct a farol that would be judged by the following criteria: a) representation of Costa Rica; b) use of materials; c) ability to be illuminated; d) creativity; e) ability to hold up/durability for use.

We put on some typical Costa Rican music and started cutting, pasting, laughing and attempting to create the best farol of the group. With a prize ready for the winning team, the stakes were high!

 

After 30 minutes, our time was up; we were asked to drop our scissors and glue sticks and step away from the table. Competition was now on!

One by one, each team explained their process and farol and showcased it to the group and the panel of Tico judges from our Idioma team, made up of Martin, Diana, Wilberth and Charlyn.

While all groups did a great job, and creativity was certainly not lacking, there was one team in particular that stood out as the clear winner. Team ‘Choza’ with Sarah, Lintonia, Fredman and Alexis won with their farol!

The winning team was rewarded with a pair of movie tickets for them and a friend in addition to proudly wearing the badge of honor of winning the very first Annual Idioma Farol Contest, 2018.

The entire morning and celebration were very special and it was a half-day event filled with culture, food, music, merriment and making connections with people of different ages, nationalities, backgrounds and experiences.

That afternoon, one of our adult students took some time to send along her gratitude for the event. Her words truly sum up the spirit of the day, and the spirit by which we live and work as a team at Idioma Internacional:

Muchísimas gracias por invitarme hoy a la actividad de Idioma, me encantó. Muchas gracias a todos ustedes por devolverme la alegría y sentirme agradecida por el país que me vio nacer.

Felicito al equipo por el gran trabajo, en Idioma Internacional se siente el amor, cariño y dedicación para hacer las cosas de verdad que los felicito. Que viva Costa Rica!

-Brendan Mulhall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Idioma Internacional Holiday Party

On a Saturday, many of the staff were coming from teaching their respective colegio (high-school) classes, and began to arrive individually. Some of us, the author included, came straight from the class they had just taught. These days are never short. It is often difficult to find energy for anything after. However, this special Saturday gave each of us something to look forward to: THE COMPANY HOLIDAY PARTY!

We knew we were going to a restaurant. We knew there would be paella. We knew we had to dress nice. We didn’t know anything else. We met at the office. We greeted each other with the same exhausted expressions as most Saturdays, but there was a glint, a spark of excitement that came from knowing we were all going to be together for the night. We so rarely get the whole crew together.

I arrived a little early, around 5 pm, and only one other teacher was there. He and I watched some comedy, and I opened my first beer. I took a quick shower and dressed for the occasion. As I finished getting ready, the others began to arrive. Each and every one of the crew looked fantastic in their ‘dinner attire.’ Everything began to move a little faster. Multiple greetings, hugs, handshakes, backslaps, beers cracked, wine poured laughter, adoring voices. All of a sudden it was time to line up for the group photos. In typical fashion, we took one nice photo and several frivolous ones. The frivolous ones are always more of a true representation of our inner strangeness. Now that the pictures were taken, we loaded the cooler, double checked for bags and purses and packed into the buseta  (mini-bus).

On the ride to our still mostly unknown destination, chosen and planned by the ‘elusive’ administrative staff, we found our inner children that hide just below our professional surfaces. With the excitement of going on an elementary school field trip, we began singing 90’s pop songs, laughing out of our seats, and exchanging the jovial stories of the season. I am sure the bus driver hated us.

As we neared the destination, the city gave way to some really incredible views of the central valley from our windows. You could see the city’s glow. The lights timed perfectly for our Holiday spirits. After what seemed a long time, since most of us needed to use the restroom, we arrived at the restaurant: La Lluna de Valencia.  http://lallunadevalencia.com/

xmas party - sign

We exited the bus in the street and walked through a brick and wooden garden. It was already past dark, and we couldn’t see much, but you could tell it was beautiful. Once inside, the atmosphere livened and we all immediately became aware of the incredible establishment we had entered. The lofty, wood-beamed ceilings, classic Spanish decorations, polished wooden tables, and rich warm lighting invoked a sense of home, comfort, and peace.

As everyone found their seats around one of the two large tables that were reserved, the wine and sangria began to flow in torrents. Our general manager was quick to provide a beautiful toast, thanking all of us and officially beginning the party.

The entire crew feeling comfortable, delighted, and hungry began to tell stories and jokes. Laughter could be heard all around. We were a cacophony of merriment. Wine in nearly every glass, the first course was brought out. I wish I could tell you what the first course was. I wish that at some point I could recall the look, taste, and feel of that course. However, what actually has stuck in my mind is when our gracious host arrived to greet us. Vincente Aguilar Cerezo is the type of man that could easily have a novel written about him. His incredible positivity, charming presence, and booming voice and laughter deserve their own story. For now, suffice it to say that he made the experience perfect for us.

Vincente brought a wine skein with him. He taught us the ways to use the skein. We had to slap the leather pouch, and squeeze a stream of wine into our mouths. He first demonstrated this by making a round of our entire group and doing the pouring for us. If he believed you could handle it, he would pour it from your nose into your mouth. Strange, I know. But, as they say, when in Rome. I doubt you could deny him even if you wanted to. His demeanor was intoxicating all on its own.

The next course arrived, sardines with oil and garlic on delicious bread. We continued our joyful satisfaction of each other’s company. The mood was increasingly more fun, we got louder, the food was passed around and consumed. After a few more refills, the main dish was delivered: massive, piping-hot pans of traditional paella. Vincente, our amazing host, served every plate whether it was vegetarian, pescatarian, or the fully traditional chicken variety.

xmas party - el jefe

Once the entire room had been served their dinner portions, the lights began to grow dimmer and flicker out. A giant bowl was placed on a stage in the center of the room, and Vincente took his place. The final lights were extinguished, and Vincente lit the bowl on fire. The blue glow of the flames danced in the bowl and the host began to stir and lift the flaming liquid high into the air. A waterfall of fire was the only illumination in the room as Vincente ladled his mysterious wizard’s potion. The show was something to admire indeed. This flaming liquor was then divided among the guests and a toast was given by the bearded Vincente like it was straight out of a storybook. This was the perfect culmination of hospitality and grace.

Afterwards, the lights were restored, and the party continued with a delicious caramelized pudding for dessert. Our group then revealed the Secret Santa gifts. This was special in so many ways. One by one, we delivered our gifts with hugs, laughter, and love. The party could not have ended any better. We all felt loved as though we were all family.

Our buseta ride back to the office was more of the same: loud laughter, singing, story-telling, and general joy. I won’t lie, it felt a lot shorter than the way to the restaurant. This night was incredible in every way. We continued to build these rare and amazing friendships that will be remembered for the rest of our lives. There are no ways to truly express how unbelievable it feels to be part of a team that can share such great memories and experiences. With every gathering, we truly become more like family, and since most of us have left ours in our respective motherlands, this feeling really creates an unmatchable joy in our usually busy lives. I will forever be grateful for the companionship we have developed. SALUD!

Tamal: Tico Christmas Tradition

Never have experienced the Holiday season in Costa Rica (or any other country) I didn’t know what to expect. There are no snow-covered rooftops, no fields of pine trees, no bells jingling all the way. However, there are tamales. I have not witnessed a tradition here that is more carefully observed than the Holiday season tamal. Unlike Mexico and the Unite States, the Costa Rican spelling is Spanish (literally from Spain) without the last letter ‘e.’ Nearly every family in Costa Rica will partake in this tradition. So many that the University of Costa Rica concluded in a study that “196 million pairs of tamales [are] eaten during December [which equals] three tamales per Tico per day.” (www.ticotimes.net) That is truly a mountain of tamales.

Dating back almost 500 years ago, the tamal tradition has been more Costa Rican than the phrase, “pura vida.” Recipes vary from home to home, but this is incredibly family oriented. “Grandmothers and mothers will teach granddaughters and daughters how to make tamales; making sure the tradition is kept alive.” (qcostarica.com) Although it may not have always been part of Christmas, it has been part of tradition since before the Spanish conquistadors arrived in Costa Rica. “The corn filling symbolized the sun god for indigenous people 500 years ago, but when Spanish conquistadors colonized the isthmus, the food became part of festivities celebrating the immaculate conception and Christmas.” (www.ticotimes.net)

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No historian can pinpoint the exact origin of tamales, but we do know that they have been around for millennia. “Tamales originated in Mesoamerica as early as 8000 to 5000 BC. As making tamales is a simple method of cooking corn, it may have been brought from Mexico to Central and South America.” (en.wikipedia.org) For our intents and purposes though, the tamal tradition in Costa Rica can be considered beginning with life itself. “The truth is, all Costa Ricans will remember having eaten them since they were small children.” (qcostarica.com) Therefore, they have been around as long as anyone can remember.

Although tamales are made year-round, the tradition is based around the Holiday season, especially the month of December. It doesn’t matter when you decide to eat them, you will see people enjoying tamales for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. However, “they are absolutely fundamental for coffee break time” (qcostarica.com) known very properly as tamaleada, “the tradition of taking a break from buying gifts to invite friends over to the house in the afternoon to share a tamal, a cup of coffee and some good conversation.” (www.ticotimes.net)

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Whether you are an outsider like me, a visiting tourist, or a local the tamal tradition in Costa Rica is all-encompassing. You will see the supermarkets fill entire isles with the ingredients to make them. Anyone here will tell you about their experiences making tamales with their families every year for as long as they can remember. It doesn’t matter if you are staying in the city, or on a remote beach front, if you happen to be in Costa Rica in December, you will experience the beauty and magic of the tamal. And on that note, I think I smell tamales coming from my Tico mom’s kitchen. Time to eat!

http://www.ticotimes.net/2014/12/24/tamales-a-christmas-present-for-everyday-of-december

https://news.co.cr/christmas-traditions-of-costa-rica/30313/

http://qcostarica.com/tamales-a-christmas-tradition-in-costa-rica/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamale

Friendsgiving

In the US and Canada, Thanksgiving is a widely celebrated holiday. Most everyone knows that families gather to share lots of food and drinks, debate politics, watch football, and fall asleep on as many pieces of furniture as are available. In Costa Rica, the tradition is not celebrated at all, or at least not widely. There are no stores filled with frozen turkeys, no aisles crammed with pumpkin pie filling, no gravy boats, and no fall colored decorations. This day is not a formal holiday like it is in North America. Therefore, it is no surprise that many people that come from North America generally miss out on this regular holiday from their former lives.

All of the teachers at Idioma Internacional have made sacrifices to gain this amazing experience teaching in another country. We have left family, friends, routine, and the comfort of our former homes to be part of something that is bigger than we are. Sometimes, it can be a little disconnecting from our friends and family in our respective motherlands, especially when these family-oriented holidays are upon us with no family to celebrate.

However, the staff decided to do something that could supplement this holiday away from our original homes. Many of us have celebrated what has been widely dubbed “Friendsgiving.” This is where a group of friends get together and have the same style feast and celebration as the family-focused holiday. So, we here at Idioma Internacional did just that. We had our own Friendsgiving.

About 2 weeks prior to the holiday, one of our friendliest and most dedicated staff members made a social media group where we could share our thoughts and plans for this otherwise normal workday. We planned to get the crew together after we had all finished teaching for the day. Everyone was encouraged to bring a dish of some sort, but it was not required. As the day grew closer, it seemed like we had the entire staff wanting to participate. It was very exciting. A final surprise or Friendsgiving “miracle” was revealed the Monday before: we would all be allowed to cancel our afternoon classes in order to have more time to prepare and bond! (Dear Brendan, THANK YOU!!! -From the entire staff!)

At last, Friendsgiving was upon us. As everyone gathered and began to socialize, the kitchen was just as packed and confusing as it always is in North America. We were all laughing, and enjoying the company of each other. It was actually one of the best turn-outs for any event outside of the office. We had almost all of the teachers, many of the friends we have made that don’t work at Idioma Internacional, and several significant others in attendance. So many people, from so many backgrounds in the same room created a very lively and exhilarating experience.

At around 8 pm, the food was fully prepared. I had made a beer-and-supply-run shortly before, so we had all of the essentials ready to be devoured. There were more dishes than I could count: chicken (turkeys are rare here), green beans, salads of every variety, chili, vegan stuffed peppers, mashed potatoes, macaroni and cheese, salmon carpaccio, tres leches, pumpkin pie, cranberries, brownie-like amazing new dessert, and more things that I can’t remember. It was possibly the largest feast that I have ever attended. Once everyone had a plate in hand, and a seat in the room, we began to go around and tell each other what we were grateful for. This is a tradition that not even my family does anymore. It was emotional, heartfelt, controversial, tear-jerking, and inspiring. Everyone was allowed to say whatever they liked. It was a magical experience to say the least.

Once the food was consumed, the thanks given, the memories created, we all enjoyed a few more hours celebrating these rare and often underappreciated friendships that we have built in our varied times here in Costa Rica. Many of the people in attendance will not be present next year, but that didn’t stop us from having an amazing experience together. We have built a tradition of love, peace, friendship, and shared experiences. We may not always realize how important these moments are in our lives, but we will be able to take these memories with us forever. This was a time where it was clearly evident how much we need each other as humans. It was magical, spectacular, beautiful, incredible, and will be remembered forever. I will be thankful for this for the rest of my life.

 

Cahuita: The Beach and Jungle Paradise

Upon receiving the exciting news that my friend and his father from the states were coming to visit me here in Costa Rica, I began searching for interesting things to do.  My friend and his father had only requested, “beach, snorkeling, chill.” Fortunately, Costa Rica is abundant with activities that fall into those specified categories.

My research paid off big time when I found out about Cahuita. It had everything that the boys wanted. So I booked the hostel and waited impatiently for my friends’ arrival. They got to San Jose late in the evening, but I made my way to their hotel to celebrate their arrival and have a few toasts.

We left 2 days later for the paradise by the Caribbean Sea. Our drive took us through some of the most twisted, and beautiful mountain views I had ever seen. As we neared our destination, we could see the ocean, a mere 20 meters from the road. Our excitement was palatable, a static energy you could feel at every pore. We rolled the windows down and breathed in the salty air.

The town of Cahuita is small, barely 5 city blocks worth of actual town, but it is densely packed with restaurants, bars, knick-knack shops, tourist companies, and mini markets. We made our way to the hostel, Cabinas Caribe Luna, and saw just what peaceful Caribbean life really looks like. We met with the owners Enrica and David. They had the sweetest and most welcoming demeanor. They were the essence of “Pura Vida.” Their property is tucked neatly back into the wilderness, but still close enough to walk to the beach, the town, the national park. The cabins are individually set back in a romantic garden that is well maintained by Enrica and David. David has even begun marking each plant and tree with their names. There is a small stone sitting circle that I dubbed the “philosophy classroom.” It’s a perfect place for meditation, relaxation, and the mental reset we all need at one time or another.

 

After setting up our gear in the hostel cabin, we left to get supplies and head down to the beach. The town itself is quaint, quiet, and beautiful. We picked up some snacks and beers and made our way to the closest beach (which was about 300 meters from our hostel). Our first day was spent lounging by the beach with beers in hand. The views are as incredible as you can imagine. The water is clear, the sand soft and warm, the misting sea salt air embraces your lungs.

That night we had a simple dinner at one of the local watering holes, where we enjoyed some beers and the company. We spent the rest of the night playing cards on our peaceful patio. The sounds of the night crept up on us and we all slowly drifted off to sleep.

I woke, sweating (it’s rather warm on the Caribbean coast), but I was delighted to get started on our day. We all had a meager breakfast of cereal bars and orange juice. The night before, we had booked our snorkeling and jungle tour. We were only an hour away from swimming in the largest coral reef in Costa Rica.

My companions and I walked the ten minutes to the tour company that we had booked with. We met our guide, received the simple instructions, fitted our gear, and followed Alex, our tour guide, to the boat. After a few minutes of getting everyone settled in the small boat, we made our way out onto the open water. We were never too far off shore, but the breeze caressing my skin felt like a lover’s hand stroking my beard as I drift to sleep. In other words, pure bliss.

When we reached the first reef stop, we were again reminded of the rules: no standing, no touching the corals, stay close to the boat, etc. We then plunged ourselves into a fantasy. The moment I was in the water with mask and snorkel at the ready, I was immediately in view of an underwater universe I had yet to experience in my life. There were fish of every color. We saw a nurse shark, held a sea cucumber, watched a school of fish whose numbers reached in the thousands. There was every variety of coral, alive and intoxicating to see. We eventually went to another stop a little closer to shore where the scene was just as beautiful and awe-inspiring as the first.

After about two hours of snorkeling, the group was ready to return to shore and begin our jungle hike part of the adventure. I felt like we were waiting forever, but in reality it was probably about 45 minutes. It is amazing how much anticipation can alter our sense of time.

When we finally embarked on the easy hike, it seemed as if there were too many people to see anything very interesting. I feared we would be too loud and keep the animals away. However, within ten minutes of the journey, I was corrected. Alex, our tour guide had already spotted the first sloth. Perched just a few meters out of reach, a mother and her cub were cuddled together gazing at the humans uninterestedly. This was how the hike went: about every ten to fifteen minutes, Alex would spot something else of interest for us inexperienced tourists. We were able to see golden spiders, white-faced monkeys, howler monkeys, basilisks (both green and brown), a variety of snakes (both venomous and non), pelicans in the bay, tarantulas, and many types of butterfly. There may have been more as well, but it was a lot to see in one short afternoon in the jungle. There is no better way to describe it other than magnificent.

The rest of the day we ate lunch, relaxed at the hostel, and then enjoyed a bit more time on the beaches. The next day was more of the same. The adventure was complete, we never wanted to leave. We had found paradise.

 

 

Día del Encuentro de Culturas

Literally translated as Day of the Encounter of Cultures, October 12th marks the 525th anniversary of Christopher Colombus’ discovery of the Americas. Costa Rica celebrates this day as a national holiday. Throughout the Americas, the holiday has several names: Colombus Day in the United States; Discovery Day in the Bahamas, and Americas Day elsewhere.

The celebration here in Costa Rica is centered around the blending of cultures honoring diversity, tolerance, exchange of goods, trade, and respect among cultures. It is viewed as a time to reflect on a mindfulness of positive change, multi-culturalism, and miscegenation (the interbreeding of people considered to be of different races). https://en.oxforddictionaries.com

all hands

 

The actual festivities in which Costa Ricans participate include local meetings, forums, and fairs that give praise and awareness to the aboriginal people of the Americas. Also, some of the Caribbean towns and cities will hold their own carnivals to give thanks to the influence of the African cultures that have also greatly impacted Costa Rica’s rich diversity. Many people located all over the country will participate in traditional dances, music, and cuisine. This holiday truly represents the idea of tolerance and extends to include many ideas of international relations.

Village CR

These holidays have been called into question lately all throughout the Americas because of the atrocities committed by Colombus and his conquering parties, the horrific conditions endured by the aboriginal people of the Americas, and the fact that there is evidence of others discovering the Americas before 1492.  However, the focus in Costa Rica is on the positive outcomes of economic trade routes, diversification of peoples and agriculture, and multi-cultural/ multi-lingual education.

Sources:

http://www.turismocostarica.org/turismocostarica_informacion_costarica.aspx?idContent=19

http://www.cuandopasa.com/index.php?v=v85570h

Independence Day, September 15th

Similar to many other nations around the world, Costa Rica has a strong celebration for the nation’s independence. September 15th marks the day that Costa Rica was granted its independence from Spanish Colonial rule in 1821. The date was the final victory by Mexico in the Mexican War for Independence. After Mexico’s victory, “Guatemala declared independence on behalf of Central America.” (www.costarica.com) Spain granted the claimed independence without further conflict.

“Independence Day celebrations begin on September 14th, when the Torch of Freedom arrives in Cartago.” Many young children will crowd the street with hand-made lanterns that are symbolic of the Torch of Freedom. That night, when the torch reaches the final destination of Cartago, the original capital when independence was claimed, the entire nation stands to sing the national anthem.  The rest of the celebration takes place on September 15th with street parades honoring traditions of the nation’s forming. These are held in every town throughout the country. (www.costarica.com)

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With that little piece of history in mind the author decided to ask Costa Rican’s what Independence Day means for them. The results below are told by former and current students in Idioma Internacional’s program, and give a much broader understanding of what Independence Day truly means to the people.

What does Independence Day Mean for You?

“Everything that the Costa Rican people did to be today the country [it] is… every year that passes since we [became] independent we must try to love and protect the country more and make it a better place for the future generations” -Axel H.

“[T}he day of independence is one of the days where Costa Ricans unite to celebrate the importance of being an independent and democratic nation. Also, it is one of my favorite days of the year for the colorful parades, the hymns, “la marimba,” that are part of the national identity that we can still enjoy in the country.” -Cameron Z.

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“For me [it] means peace, love to Costa Rica… the country in that moment shows [strength] and power.” -Noelany A.

“It’s a free day! Haha! In Costa Rica a little percentage of the habitats don’t have traditions or celebrate so much that day… [However], so many people have the tradition to go see the Patriotic March, with bands and mascaradas. In the schools, [we] celebrate that date [all] week (Civic Week) and all days [we] sing the national anthem and have activities. For me, it’s another celebration!” -Jeison V.

“Independence means peace, love, pride, and sacrifice. It’s a special day to commemorate all those who fought for freedom.” -Melannie M.

“For me Independence Day means liberty. It is something that [changes] our perspective about the world. It changes the reality of Costa Rica, [and] our economy increases. When we see the nature, it reflects the most beautiful part of our nation. When we go to our traditional parade in San Jose, we enjoy the music, the dancers and also we feel proud our country is without an army! We think about the poor areas and just want to eradicate all their problems. I feel proud because we don’t have an army and we spent the money on education!” -Edwin B.

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“For me this day is important and very significant for us because since that day we receive the most valuable feeling that we have as human beings: Freedom. We as citizens of this country have the privilege of saying that we live in a country that solves any conflict with a dialogue and not by fighting because everyone has the freedom to express what they think. That’s a privilege that not all countries have and we must appreciate it and celebrate for that!” -Tatiana O.

“Independence Day is a synonym of freedom, and it means that we have the opportunity to reflect [on] our identity. [It is] one of the multiple reasons to be proud of our beautiful country. It means peace, gratitude, happiness, opportunities, development, growth. For me Independence Day is a reminder of how Pura Vida we are!” -Alexandra M.

“For me, Independence Day means like a celebration of our freedom because we were slaves of the Spanish people. Our culture was given back to us. Also, to give honor to those who fought for us to set us free. And to live in peace with all the countries around the world.” -Dariana D.

Día de las Madres

Mother’s Day is celebrated in many countries throughout the world. In the US it is typically on the first Sunday of May. Although there are many shared holidays between the US and Costa Rica, Mother’s Day is not one of them. Here in Costa Rica, Mother’s Day is celebrated on August 15th. This corresponds with the Roman Catholic feast day of The Assumption of Mary. “The Assumption of Mary is a feast day recognizing the selfless and earthly life of Mary and the divinity associated with her heavenly soul,” according to http://www.prosoftnearshore.com/mothers-day-in-costa-rica-august-15/. Unlike the US, Mother’s Day in Costa Rica is National Holiday. The entire day is dedicated to celebrating our mothers.

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Although it is important everywhere, the dual purpose of the holiday here in Costa Rica shows how much respect and honor we have for our mothers. There are many ways that people celebrate this very special day. Some of which include buying all types of gifts, taking mothers out for special meals, and making sure they don’t have to do any work. Mainly, the mothers that I spoke with on this day just wanted to be surrounded by family and loved ones. It is most important to make sure they know how much you love them.

mom pics

“Ma! You get to celebrate twice a year while I live in Costa Rica,” I told my mother when I called in May. She loved the idea. Even though I wouldn’t be able to fly home and visit, we were able to speak on the phone for a few hours. We digitally cheers-ed each other, and drank some wine. Even though this article is a little after the fact, every day could be Mother’s Day. So please don’t forget to tell your mothers that you love and respect them. Every day would be ideal, but we know that’s not always possible.

On that note, I love you MA!

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