Weather / Tropics

One of the defining characteristics of Costa Rica is its ideal climate.

Costa Rica has 12 different climate zones ranging from hot and humid to cold and windy. This diversity of microclimates in Costa Rica allows a great variety of landscapes and biodiversity.

One of the defining characteristics of Costa Rica is its ideal climate. In addition to being ideal, the climate is also varied as Costa Rica has 12 different climate zones ranging from hot and humid to cold and windy. This diversity of microclimates in Costa Rica allows for a great variety of landscapes and biodiversity. During the dry season, which runs from December to April, the rain is infrequent and it is an average of 1 or 2 degrees Celsius warmer than in the rainy season.

The rainy season, or green season as it is sometimes called, takes place between May and November. During the green season, rain is common in the afternoons. Although the dry season is more popular with tourists as it coincides with the Northern Hemisphere’s winter and the weather is spectacular, the green season is increasingly popular with visitors interested in nature and wildlife as the landscape becomes more vibrant and animal activity increases. The green season is also a good time to travel as the attractions are less crowded and the accommodation prices are much lower than in high season.

For many people, the ideal climate is in the Central Valley of Costa Rica which is situated 1,172 meters (3,854 feet) above sea level. San Jose has a pleasant average temperature ranging from 19 to 25 C (roughly 70 and 82 F) which has lead some people to call it the city of “eternal spring” and it is often perfect for outdoors activities.

Additionally, for those who prefer the heat, Jaco beach is merely an hour away and has a much warmer climate. If you need to cool down, the mountains of Heredia are also approximately an hour away and offer cool relief on warm days. This perfect variety of climates is one of the many reasons that expats in Costa Rica are the happiest in the world.

Safety / Stability

Costa Rica is the safest and most stable country in all of Central America and is among the top three in Latin America.

Costa Rica is the safest and most stable country in all of Central America and is among the top three in Latin America. Costa Rica’s economy has experienced economic growth during the last 25 years which has allowed it to avoid political instability and security problems present in other Central American countries. Costa Ricans, or Ticos as they are called here, pride themselves on their peaceful nature and Costa Rica has not had military since 1949. While it is very important to exercise common sense and caution as you would anywhere else in the world, the majority of people who visit and live in Costa Rica do not experience any problems.

Spanish Language & Culture

Costa Rica’s culture can be summed up in in two words: “Pura vida!” Pura vida can be translated as pure life or real living. This phrase is used everywhere and at any time. It can mean hello, goodbye, I’m happy, awesome, thank you, or you’re welcome. Nowadays pura vida is more than just an expression, it is a way of life. Costa Rican culture is very relaxed and open and Ticos are eager to engage with and befriend people from all over the world. The people of Costa Rica are very proud of their culture and love to enjoy the beauty of their country. To help teachers fully participate in Costa Rican culture, we provide free Spanish classes to all of our teachers.

Diversity of Ecoturism / Travel

Costa Rica’s tourism industry is very well developed and there is something for everyone to do on their downtime.

For many, Costa Rica is synonymous with a tropical beach paradise, and while that may be true, there is much more for (you) to do.

Costa Rica’s tourism industry is very well developed and there is something for everyone to do on their downtime. For many, Costa Rica is synonymous with a tropical beach paradise, and while that may be true, there is much more for you to do. For the thrifty traveler, Costa Rica has a safe, extensive, and reliable bus service which extends to all corners of the country. In addition to public buses, teachers living in Costa Rica can rent a car or hire a private driver to get to any destination.

Costa Rica has a Pacific and Caribbean coast and no two beaches are alike. At some beaches, you will find five star restaurants, luxury hotels and spas. At others, you’ll find more modest and budget conscious accommodations. But at most beaches you’ll find any price point that suits your pocketbook.   

Jaco, the closest beach to San Jose, is a surfer’s paradise and an easy day trip. Costa Ricans and tourists alike love to day trip to this beach so they can take in some sun and enjoy some food from one of the many restaurants.

Perhaps the most famous place in Costa Rica is Manuel Antonio National Park. The diversity of wildlife in this small and accessible national park is unequaled with 109 species of mammals (including both species of sloths!) along with 184 species of birds.

In addition to the variety of wildlife, Costa Rica also boasts of 6 active volcanoes and 200 dormant volcanoes or volcanic formations, many of which are easily accessible while others require hiking. Poas and Irazu are active volcanoes in Costa Rica’s Central Valley which are easily accessible by public transportation for a day trip.

Costa Rica is perfect for the nature lover as its microclimates allow for an incredible variety of animals, plants, fungi, and fish to flourish. Costa Rica is considered to have the highest density of biodiversity of any country in the world.

And while the natural beauty of Costa Rica is what draws many people to live here, people teaching English in Costa Rica can also explore the cultural side of the country. You can visit one of Costa Rica’s many coffee plantations, including the famous Britt plantation and its coffee tours in Heredia or you can visit the artisanal town of Sarchi where beautifully painted oxcarts and handcrafted furniture are created to the delight of many.

Adventure tourism

Do you love the rush of adrenaline and love to be outdoors and active? Whether you want to go ziplining through a cloud forest, rafting and kayaking through tropical rivers, mountain biking, bungee jumping, skydiving, hang gliding, ATV-ing, dirt biking, it’s all here waiting for you to create some enduring memories and some unforgettable tales to tell your family and friends.

Nicaragua/Panama

Costa Rica’s neighbours, Nicaragua and Costa Rica are very accessible by plane, bus, or car. Although the economy of Nicaragua is much smaller than Costa Rica, the colonial cities of Granada and Leon are an excellent touristic destination. In addition, Nicaragua has the remarkable volcanic island of Ometepe.

To the south of Costa Rica is Panama which hosts a growing tourism industry. Immediately across the border of Costa Rica is the Caribbean province of Bocas del Toro with its white sand beaches. Further inland is cosmopolitan Panama City with the modern financial centre full of skyscrapers and Casco Viejo, the most popular attraction in the city, whose architecture and streets will bring you back to a time when Panama was part of Colombia.

San José: a little bit of everything

San Jose is the financial, cultural, governmental and political center of Costa Rica. In San Jose you will find a little bit of everything.

The Central Market bustles and a variety of goods and food for sale. The National Theater along with three of Costa Rica’s best museums are found very close to each other right in the heart of downtown San Jose. Each offer offer insights into the country and its history and culture.

San Jose also offers restaurants from all over the world and particularly Latin America. You’ll find fare from Colombia, Argentina, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Chile, Peru, El Salvador, Brazil, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic restaurants among many others.

San Jose is also famous for its nightlife in the neighborhoods of La California, San Pedro, and Escalante which are well known country-wide for their unique clubs, bars, and after hours spots.

Close and Accessible to Homeland Culture

Although Costa Rica may seem worlds away from home, it is very accessible from North America and, increasingly, from Europe. Costa Rica is a 3 hour flight from Miami and about 5.5 hours from Toronto. This makes visits home or visitors to Costa Rica, not only possible, but easy.  Because let’s face it, with all the amazing things to do here, your friends and family are going to want to visit you here!